Posted by: Lister | October 12, 2007

Blackwater Guards Fired at Fleeing Cars

According to US soldiers, some of whom were on the scene within half an hour of the shooting.

Blackwater USA guards shot at Iraqi civilians as they tried to drive away from a Baghdad square on Sept. 16, according to a report compiled by the first U.S. soldiers to arrive at the scene, where they found no evidence that Iraqis had fired weapons.

“It appeared to me they were fleeing the scene when they were engaged. It had every indication of an excessive shooting,” said Lt. Col. Mike Tarsa, whose soldiers reached Nisoor Square 20 to 25 minutes after the gunfire subsided.

His soldiers’ report — based upon their observations at the scene, eyewitness interviews and discussions with Iraqi police — concluded that there was “no enemy activity involved” and described the shootings as a “criminal event.” Their conclusions mirrored those reached by the Iraqi government, which has said the Blackwater guards killed 17 people.

The soldiers’ accounts contradict Blackwater’s assertion that its guards were defending themselves after being fired upon by Iraqi police and gunmen.

[…] Attorneys for Talib Mutlaq Deewan, who was injured in the shootings, and the families of Himoud Saed Atban, Usama Fadhil Abbass and Oday Ismail Ibraheem, who were killed, filed the lawsuit in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, asking for unspecified damages to compensate for alleged war crimes, illegal killings, wrongful death, emotional distress and negligence. The lawsuit names Blackwater USA, the Prince Group and Blackwater founder and chief executive Erik Prince as defendants.

[…] An Iraqi colonel walked up to Tarsa and described the Blackwater shooters as men in “tan uniforms, black helmets, and that flag,” pointing at the U.S. flag on Tarsa’s sleeve. The colonel added that he knew the U.S. military wasn’t involved. Still, Tarsa dispatched his soldiers across their sector over the next few days.

“I wanted our guys to be on the ground, to look people in the eye, to listen to their anguish, listen to their outrage, to let them know we’re going to help those people personally affected,” Tarsa said.

“I was concerned about acts of vengeance and misinformation somehow indicating we were part of this event,” he said.

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